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Bensalem (215) 639-4500
Philadelphia (215) 291-0800
Hamilton, NJ (609) 586-6700

May 2021

Monday, 31 May 2021 00:00

Gout Pain Can Be Managed

Gout is a painful, inflammatory form of arthritis. Those affected will typically feel an intense stiffness in the joints of their feet, particularly in the big toe. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

Walking shoes and running shoes are designed to accommodate different types of weight distribution, impact, and strides. Walking is a low-impact activity where an individual’s body weight rolls from heel to toe—distributing it evenly throughout the feet. Running is a high-impact activity requiring the body to absorb approximately three times its weight in various parts of the foot, depending on the running style and speed of movement. Walking shoes have a thick outsole and are generally more structured than a running shoe. They offer cushioned midsoles, stability and support for the heel, ankles and calves, and wide toe boxes. Running shoes come in a range of styles to help alleviate the force various running strides put on different areas of the feet. They are typically lighter weight than walking shoes to allow airflow, but provide extra cushioning at the heel and toe. Running shoes also have varying levels of support but are typically more flexible than walking shoes. A podiatrist can suggest walking and running shoes and create custom orthotics that are best suited for an individual’s specific foot structure and needs.

For more information about walking shoes versus running shoes, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors can measure your feet to determine what your needs are and help you find an appropriate pair of footwear.

Foot Health: The Differences between Walking & Running Shoes

There are great ways to stay in shape: running and walking are two great exercises to a healthy lifestyle. It is important to know that running shoes and walking shoes are not interchangeable. There is a key difference on how the feet hit the ground when someone is running or walking. This is why one should be aware that a shoe is designed differently for each activity.

You may be asking yourself what the real differences are between walking and running shoes and the answers may shock you.

Differences

Walking doesn’t involve as much stress or impact on the feet as running does. However, this doesn’t mean that you should be any less prepared. When you’re walking, you land on your heels and have your foot roll forward. This rolling motion requires additional support to the feet.

Flexibility – Walking shoes are designed to have soft, flexible soles. This allows the walker to push off easily with each step.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Walking Shoes vs. Running Shoes
Monday, 17 May 2021 00:00

What Is PAD?

Peripheral artery disease or “PAD”, is a medical condition in which there is inadequate blood flow to the lower limbs due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries. Plaque is a fatty substance that clings to the walls of the arteries, making them narrow and harden. PAD is fairly common, affecting 20% of people over the age of 65, and can lead to serious complications if left undetected. However, many people who have PAD have no symptoms. Those that do have symptoms may notice an increase in leg pain, fatigue, and cramps while walking or exercising, numbness, achiness, or heaviness in the legs, skin discoloration, poor nail and hair growth, and the development of poorly healing wounds on the legs and feet. If you are over the age of 65, have diabetes, have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or a history of heart disease, stroke, or metabolic syndrome, then you are at an increased risk for PAD. A podiatrist can help diagnose this condition and offer treatment options that will reduce foot and ankle pain and restore mobility. 

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease

Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection caused by fungi that thrive and grow in warm and moist environments such as showers, locker rooms, and pools. Because Athlete’s foot is very contagious, it can even spread from towels, floors, or clothing. Athlete’s foot presents itself as a red, scaly rash between the toes. The infection will become itchy and form blisters, and the skin will become cracked and peel. As the infection spreads to the toenails, they will become thick and discolored as well. If left untreated, the infection can spread to the entire foot and even to the hands. Because of how contagious it is, it is important to keep the feet dry and to not share any personal items such as socks, shoes, or towels. If you notice the signs of Athlete’s foot, visiting a podiatrist is suggested.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Athlete’s Foot

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Monday, 03 May 2021 00:00

What Does Cuboid Syndrome Feel Like?

Cuboid syndrome is a condition in which the cuboid bone, located in the middle of the foot, becomes misaligned due to injury. This can cause sharp pain on the outer side of the foot, as well as underneath the foot. The pain can come on suddenly and gradually worsen while you walk or stand, but can be relieved by taking weight off of the affected foot. You may also notice mild swelling along the outside of the foot. The symptoms of cuboid syndrome can make it difficult or impossible to walk, and pain can persist for days or even weeks. If you are experiencing foot pain, it is strongly suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist, who can diagnose and treat your condition. 

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about All About Cuboid Syndrome
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