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Bensalem (215) 639-4500
Philadelphia (215) 291-0800
Hamilton, NJ (609) 586-6700

July 2021

Tuesday, 27 July 2021 00:00

When Cracked Heels Become Painful

Heel fissures (cracked heels) that deepen may not only be unattractive, but painful. Left untreated, they may form hardened calluses, bleed, or even become infected. Cracked heels are usually the result of dry skin. Sometimes, this is exacerbated by obesity—which can cause dry skin to stiffen and crack when it is overly stretched. Standing on hard flooring for prolonged periods, as well as wearing poorly fitting or open-back shoes, or having certain foot disorders, psoriasis, eczema, and other medical conditions may also contribute to the development of cracked heels. You can help prevent heel fissures from occurring by keeping your feet hydrated with emollient or humectant moisturizers, limiting your time in the shower or bath, and opting for warm, rather than hot, water. Severely cracked or bleeding heels should be cared for by a podiatrist who can help prevent them from becoming infected.

If the skin on your feet starts to crack, you may want to see a podiatrist to find treatment. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

It is important to moisturize your cracked heels in order to prevent pain, bleeding, and infection. The reason cracked heels form is because the skin on the foot is too dry to support the immense pressure placed on them. When the foot expands, the dry skin on the foot begins to split.

Ways to Help Heal Them

  • Invest in a good foot cream
  • Try Using Petroleum Jelly
  • Ease up on Soaps
  • Drink Plenty of Water

Ways to Prevent Cracked Heels

  • Moisturize After Showering
  • Skip a Shower
  • Keep Shower Water Lukewarm
  • Don’t Scrub Your Feet

If you are unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels, seek guidance from a podiatrist. Your doctor will help you with any questions or information you may need. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Solutions for Cracked Heels
Tuesday, 20 July 2021 00:00

Recovering From Tenosynovitis

Tenosynovitis is an inflammation of a tendon and its synovium, or lining. This condition can affect the feet or ankles and occur due to injury, repetitive overuse, excessive pressure on the tendon, or an infection. Tenosynovitis usually affects athletes, ballet dancers, and older adults. While recovering from this condition, it is suggested that you limit your leg and foot movement to decrease stress on the tendon and prevent further damage. Applying ice or heat to the area can help reduce swelling and pain. At home, you may need to wear a splint, brace, or walking boot, and may need crutches to get around. It is important to follow your doctor’s instructions so that you can recover fully and return to your usual activities as soon as possible. If you are experiencing ankle pain, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Ankle pain can have many different causes and the pain may potentially be serious. If you have ankle pain, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Ankle pain is any condition that causes pain in the ankle. Due to the fact that the ankle consists of tendons, muscles, bones, and ligaments, ankle pain can come from a number of different conditions.

Causes

The most common causes of ankle pain include:

  • Types of arthritis (rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, and gout)
  • Ankle sprains
  • Broken ankles
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • Stress fractures
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome
  • Plantar fasciitis

Symptoms

Symptoms of ankle injury vary based upon the condition. Pain may include general pain and discomfort, swelling, aching, redness, bruising, burning or stabbing sensations, and/or loss of sensation.

Diagnosis

Due to the wide variety of potential causes of ankle pain, podiatrists will utilize a number of different methods to properly diagnose ankle pain. This can include asking for personal and family medical histories and of any recent injuries. Further diagnosis may include sensation tests, a physical examination, and potentially x-rays or other imaging tests.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are rest, ice packs, keeping pressure off the foot, orthotics and braces, medication for inflammation and pain, and surgery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Tuesday, 13 July 2021 00:00

How Common Are Ankle Sprains?

Ankle sprains are extremely common, affecting approximately 25,000 people each day. They occur when one or more ligaments in the ankle are overstretched or torn. This usually happens from a sudden twisting or turning of the ankle, while waking, running, jumping, dancing, or playing a sport. Immediately following the injury, it can be beneficial to follow the R.I.C.E. acronym for sprained ankle care. R.I.C.E. stands for rest, ice, compress, and elevate. Rest your ankle by not putting more weight on it than absolutely necessary. Apply ice to the ankle to reduce pain and swelling. Compressing the ankle can also help control swelling, and provides support to the area, as often ankle sprains are accompanied by ankle joint instability. Elevate the foot while resting by propping it up higher than heart level. If you suspect that you have sprained your ankle, it is strongly suggested that you see a podiatrist as soon as possible. The podiatrist will be able to diagnose the ankle sprain, determine the severity of the injury, and prescribe the appropriate treatments. 

Ankle sprains are common but need immediate attention. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains take place when the ligaments in your ankle are torn or stretched beyond their limits. There are multiple ways that the ankle can become injured, including twisting or rolling over onto your ankle, putting undue stress on it, or causing trauma to the ankle itself.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Mild to moderate bruising
  • Limited mobility
  • Swelling
  • Discoloration of the skin (depending on severity)

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

Treatment of a sprain depends on the severity.  Many times, people are told to rest and remain off their feet completely, while others are given an air cast. If the sprain is very severe, surgery may be required.

If you have suffered an ankle sprain previously, you may want to consider additional support such as a brace and regular exercises to strengthen the ankle.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ankle Sprains
Monday, 12 July 2021 00:00

Plantar Warts Can Be Treated!

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Tuesday, 06 July 2021 00:00

Am I at Risk for Toenail Fungus?

Onychomycosis is a contagious fungal infection of the toenails. Infected nails may appear discolored, thickened, brittle, and crumbly. Onychomycosis often affects the big and little toenails, but can affect any nail. Certain people are more at risk of contracting a fungal toenail infection than others. Since the fungus responsible for toenail infections thrives in warm and moist environments, those who live in hot, humid climates, sweat excessively, wear shoes and socks with poor ventilation, experience prolonged exposure to water, or frequent areas like public swimming pools and locker rooms, are more likely to incur an infection. People who are older or have underlying health conditions, such as diabetes or psoriasis, are also at an increased risk. Having certain pre-existing foot problems, including athlete’s foot, a fungal skin infection of the feet, or a previous toenail injury can also make you more susceptible to a fungal nail infection. If you suspect that you may have onychomycosis, please seek the care of a podiatrist.

If left untreated, toenail fungus may spread to other toenails, skin, or even fingernails. If you suspect you have toenail fungus it is important to seek treatment right away. For more information about treatment, contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Symptoms

  • Warped or oddly shaped nails
  • Yellowish nails
  • Loose/separated nail
  • Buildup of bits and pieces of nail fragments under the nail
  • Brittle, broken, thickened nail

Treatment

If self-care strategies and over-the-counter medications does not help your fungus, your podiatrist may give you a prescription drug instead. Even if you find relief from your toenail fungus symptoms, you may experience a repeat infection in the future.

Prevention

In order to prevent getting toenail fungus in the future, you should always make sure to wash your feet with soap and water. After washing, it is important to dry your feet thoroughly especially in between the toes. When trimming your toenails, be sure to trim straight across instead of in a rounded shape. It is crucial not to cover up discolored nails with nail polish because that will prevent your nail from being able to “breathe”.

In some cases, surgical procedure may be needed to remove the toenail fungus. Consult with your podiatrist about the best treatment options for your case of toenail fungus.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about How to Treat Your Toenail Fungus

Poor circulation in your lower limbs means that there is reduced blood flow to the feet and ankles. This can produce a variety of symptoms. Some of the more common signs of poor blood flow is numbness, tingling, or a pins and needles sensation in the feet. Reduced blood flow can also make the feet colder than the rest of the body. Edema, or swelling due to a buildup of fluids in the lower limbs, is also common. When your lower limbs swell, they may feel heavy, stiff, painful, and warm. Other signs of poor circulation include joint pain, muscle cramps, skin discoloration, varicose veins, and poorly healing wounds on the lower limbs. Sometimes, however, poor circulation in the lower limbs can be asymptomatic and require vascular testing to detect it. If you are experiencing any symptoms of poor circulation in your feet and ankles, or if you are older and are at a higher risk of developing poor circulation, please seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose and treat this condition. 

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet

Compression or irritation of the nerve between the third and fourth toes can cause the nerve to thicken and become painful. This is known as Morton’s Neuroma.  Along with pain in the ball of the foot, symptoms may include tingling, numbness, burning, or the feeling of a pebble being stuck in your shoe. Morton’s Neuroma can be caused by injuries to the area, high heels and other footwear with a narrow toe box, or physical activities that cause repetitive stress on the ball of the foot such as running and tennis. Foot conditions such as hammertoes, flat feet, and bunions may increase the chances of developing Morton’s Neuroma. Early detection and treatment such as activity and shoe modification, injection therapy, icing, padding, and the use of orthotic devices can help avoid more invasive treatments or surgery. If you believe you may have Morton’s Neuroma, make an appointment with a podiatrist.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma

Falling is hazardous no matter how old you are, but it can be particularly dangerous for senior citizens. Here are seven ways older adults can reduce or eliminate their risk of falling: 1) Have their vision checked regularly. 2) Be careful on the stairs with one hand always on the handrail. 3) Check that medications do not cause drowsiness or dizziness. 4) Remove tripping hazards such as loose carpets and clutter. 5) Install grab bars in the bathroom and tub. 6) Light the home adequately, and 7) wear supportive footwear that fits properly. In addition, older adults should have their feet checked regularly by a podiatrist who can address any pain, balance, or mobility issues they may be experiencing.

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Care Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Falls Prevention
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